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Search Results 0 to 23 of about 24 (some duplicates have been removed)
in the election. >> i talk about this a lot, i consider myself a tpepl tph*eus, but when i watched what went on during the election and the way mitt romney was treated and the hypocrisy where the binders full of women was really ridiculed, an was treated like he was a massage tph*eus, basically and you see a picture like this with president obama, and you have the left basically making excuses for him. ruth marcus wrote something saying, it's bad but it's not an outrage. it's an outrage if it's a republican. i think this is why when they survey women and ask you do you consider a tpepl tph*eu a tpepl inch tph*eus, most women say no. martha: they don't like the implications that go along witness. let's take a look at some of the numbers here, there is a comparison of how presidents have done in terms of gender equality. i guess for lack of a better phrase. women in the cabinet, president obama so far has nine through the first term. president bush had ten total. bill clinton had 17 total. but what i was struck by, and as a woman i don't like these numbers comparison, to me it's like you don't
the bailout. that was an incredible show of will. halting and clumsy and awkward as the eu politics are, they're on the way to banking regulation in the euro zone. it's not going to be pretty and it's going to take a couple years still, but we are on our way to a stronger and more unified eu with or without britain over time. >> what do you think? >> too positive to me. europe is probably not coming apart. different said statement than europe is coming together. the reason it probably won't come together is not greece, it's france. sooner or later, that is the real test. the president of france is taking france in directions that are truly unsustainable economically. france can't leave if you're germany because that's the whole core, the whole dynamic. the relationship. germany will go to great lengths, really, whatever lengths it takes to keep france in. europe will survive but economic growth is not going to take off, still extremely weak because it doesn't have in place any of the prerequisites. >> the head of morgan stanley had a piece where he said that europe is actually going to bounce
partnership, intergovernmental cooperation destroys responsibility and accountability. look at the e.u. to the e.u. destroy greece or decrease destroy the e.u.? is probably does, but you can't tell them they'll blame each other. the founders didn't need the e.u. to save his dangerous. all this arises for intergovernmental cooperation and common during. the founders didn't need the e.u. because they have the example comintern for them, the articles of confederation. there is a constitution that prohibits this and makes it very, very difficult in any event. the second objection to justice breyer or rather the objection to a second party is feds want to send sworn off officers. let them try. it seems already suggested, they can't enable and if they do, they will have to pay the fiscal and critical praise. so in a weird way, it would be great if we have fbi agents in santa clara breaking down the doors of pot smokers. i will. i will tell people more but the federal government than 50 papers from the cato institute. [laughter] >> one minus point and then i will end. this is a force of the a
.s. and e.u. at the same time, i think we need to be realistic. i was -- [inaudible] what was that? over ten years ago, and i think there were unnecessarily optimistic views about how quickly it could be done and uncomplicated it was. it turned out that caution was better part of judgment. i think they would have to be willing essentially to open up the markets and not use various procedures to try to safeguard their market. so i favor proceedings, but with an understanding that there are immense issues to be looked at. and it's not going happen very, very quickly. i'm in favor of starting it. [inaudible] it's fancy language for -- regulations. whether allow european -- to you see opportunities to streamline the way the two economies governor themselves? >> it's the latter. let me put it this way. we have dealt with the issues regarding safeguards, safeguards and others with ore countries. we did that in negotiation with colombia. we did that in negotiations with panama. if any two entities resolve those issues, it's the e.u. and united states. essentially what the e.u. has been doing, in my
. defended dialogue with hamas. refused to join in a letter calling on e.u. to condemn hezbollah. he had a pejorative comment to jewish lobby. he has taken stances that indicateed he is less than supportive of the relationship with israel. >> there are two key democrats that could factor in how this goes. one is new york democratic senator schumer. >> he is staying quiet on the fight. talk about the real oppositio opposition. i think there will be some tough hurdles to get over with republicans. but i don't think there is enough democratic fight to stop the nomination. out of loyalty to the president who don't want him appointed will vote for him. >> bret: john kerry, fair to say he has an easy ride? >> yeah. it's an opportunity to get questions answered on benghazi or put it front and center in how the future of the state department will be run. no, i don't think there is any problem with him. >> bret: you agree, carl? >> it's interesting hearing. i agree that the committee means he gets approved but he will be asked about benghazi and about the basic tenets. and he will go on about the
to israel, but what they pose to america. when they call on the eu to designate hezbollah terrorist organization. they cite the damage that hezbollah has done to american military men and women and american security interests and for steve to just, you know, like sweep this away is, this is just israel and israel supporters wanting a bunch of love letters is really, i'd say, actually, offensive. if you look -- why is ben carden. senior democrat in a democratic conference. he came out today. so, this is a senior democrat knowing that the president of his party is about to nominate chuck hagel for secretary of defense and ben carden is raising serious questions. yet, another democrat to raise questions. what is giving them pause? i don't think it's as simple as steve just dismissed it. these love letters or disagreement over some love letters to israel. real national security issues at stake. senator hagel was opposed to sanctions against syria. one of a handful of sanctions -- >> i want to get steve to respond to you on that. i want to throw in this issue. what is a bigger issue for
for sanctions in syria. he wouldn't sign a letter to the eu to designation hezbollah a terrorist organization. if he does have a problem here, jonathan, is it going to be that republicans have made the argument he's beyond the mainstream or something we don't know about yet. >> it could be one or the other. that's why the confirmation hearings are going to be vitally important. right now as you said at the top of the show, both sides, the pro-hagel people and anti-hagel people are engaged in a bit of a campaign to sort of set of narrative for who this person could be as secretary of defense. before he sits before the confirmation hearings and answer questions, tough questions from democrats and republicans alike, on all of these issues from his support of israel to his criticisms of the iraq war, the afghanistan war, the -- his unwillingness to sign that letter designating hamas as a terrorist organization, these are all questions he's going to have to answer and how he answers them could very well determine whether he's confirmed or not. >> well, he started to answer them a little bit. he di
with them in ireland where i met with a distinct lack of enthusiasm from the e.u.'s group and the independent demigs on banking. sir john vickers, chairman of the independent commission, has criticized the u.k. coalition government for backing away from his original proposal while the recent report summarizing the responses received from the report acknowledges the widespread opposition to the proposal in a charmingly understated fashion, stating they welcome the group's analysis but argued that a compelling case of trading activities hasn't been made. they felt the proposal wasn't backed by the required evidence and there was a need for a thorough impact assessment. with all due respect to my friends in the european financial regulaer to community, when a regulatory proposal is viewed within the e.u. as being too harsh and the financial industry and harmful to marks, i think it's a clear sign it's time to take a step back and re-evaluate. regardless of what happens with respect to the vickers or like then proposal, even if all the most visitry olic allegations wall street
points to 26%. across the e.u., some 26 million people were out of work. wall street was down again today as the market marked time, waiting for corporate earnings announcements. the dow jones industrial average lost 55 points to close under 13,329. the nasdaq fell seven points to close below 3092. those are some of the day's major stories. now, back to gwen. >> ifill: we return to the u.s. consulate attack in benghazi, the only known suspect held in connection with the incident was released today in tunisia. his attorney said he was freed because of a lack of evidence. the attack, which killed u.s. ambassador to libya christopher stevens and three other americans was seen by large crowds and captured on security cameras, but the culprits have remained elusive. libyan witnesses have reportedly placed a local leader from the militant group ansar al-sharia, at the scene of the attacks. he survived a vigilante assassination attempt this week and remains at large. for more on the status of the investigation, i'm joined by nancy yousef of mcclatchy newspapers. welcome nancy. what do we know ab
proposal, set forth by the uk independent commission on banking and the eu's group. sir john vickers, chairman of the independent commission, has argued criticized the coalition government and the backing away from his original proposal. while the european commission's recent report summarizes the responses received and it acknowledges the widespread opposition of a proposal in a determinedly understated action. it argues that a compelling case for mandatory separation of trading activities hasn't been made. they felt that the proposal is not backed by the required evidence and that there was a need for thorough impact assessment. with all due respect my to my friends in the european financial regulatory community, what a regulatory proposal is used within the eu, considered too harsh on the financial industry and harmful to markets, it's a clear sign that it's time to take a step back and reevaluate. regardless of what happens respect to the proposals, even if all of the most vitriolic allegations set forth are true, even if our financial giants act solely and ruthlessly out of self
the thing that differentiates the u.s. from so many of the other countries especially in the eu we know how to fix our problem, and we're just at lagerheads as to which way to go. >> reporter: but the head of the international monetary fund christine lagarde said here "the u.s. has to confront this." if those decisions are postponed again -- >> well it will be pushing the can down the road again which was the reproach that we made against the europeans and i don't think that the u.s. should fall in that trap. >> reporter: and with the u.s. economy now showing renewed strength, the feeling here is that the u.s. could help pull up the rest of the world, if washington could just get out of the way. charlie, norah? >> anthony mason thank you. >>> in the international press institute reports that 132 journalists were killed around the world last year and reporting on the war in syria is especially dangerous for westerners. more than two months ago american freelance correspondent james foley was abducted by armed gunmen and hasn't been heard from since. he's a friend of o
. 89 senators voted for it. he voted against it. a letter to the eu asking the eu to designate hezbollah a terrorist organization. 88 senators signed it. he was one of the ones who didn't. when there was a letter to russia asking to deal with the rising tide of anti-semitism in russia. 99 senators signed the letter, one did not, chuck hagel. he has the right to have those interviews but there is a bipartisan consensus in washington illustrated by the math outside it. the question is why does the president want that in the discussion? why does he want that person with those judgments running the pentagon at this time? those are important questions to be explored during the hearing. >> he should have the opportunity to answer that. he has made clear on matters that impact israel the most in a positive way, i would not have been on the side of senator hagel in those votes, important to answer it and important to look at his entire record. on the things that matter most with u.s. policy and our great ally, israel, he has been as responsible as any when it comes to financial support
british voters to decide whether or not they should exit the eu by 2017. cameron argued for continued membership but in a more streamlined european union with fewer restrictive regulations. >> from our parade of papers, "the omaha world herald," the governor of nebraska has given the okay for the keystone pipeline to run through his state effectively leaving the decision now of whether or not to green-light the 1700-mile project to the obama administration. the president has pushed back a decision on the project until after march, but the pipeline's future remains in doubt as president obama rejected a plan a year ago, you'll recall, saying the legislation didn't give enough time for the government to give it a thorough review. >> and you know, michael steele, we were talking this morning about how the republicans move forward in a more thoughtful, strategic way. still being tough. >> yeah. >> you can be tough. you can be conservative. you can still be smart. >> be smart. that's right. >> we haven't been smart. a guy who has been smart, chris christie. new quinnipiac poll numbers out
. you made a great point here, it is highly contagious, it's more contagious than the tphrao*eu. another thing it has in common with the flu is it changes rapidly it mutates. this year's strain is not the same as last year's strain. when you have a new strain you get twice as many cases. this is a very problematic thing. it's going to spread all over the country. i want the people out there to distinguish the symptoms. if you're feeling the vomiting, nausea, the diarrhea this is the n o noro virus. bill: you say it starts in utah. >> it's having huge out breaks in nursing homes and churches in utah. my guess is that somebody flew over from england or wales to utah bringing it there. plane flights spreads this incredibly rapidly. bill: if that is the case you have to wash your hands, man, that is your defense number one is it not? >> right, the flu is the respiratory virus. this one you get by touching sur tpaes, eac surfaces, touching food, you need to stay away from people when you're actually sick with this. bill: keep the fingertips out of your eyes. you see people doing that, that is
pedestrians just can't see cars coming up the 4eu8. >> i'm new to san francisco in the last five months, so this is a new area for me and i am aware of the problems with this in particular. so it breaks my heart, having children of my own. >> now there is a sign that you can see there that says no crossing at that intersection. police haven't said whether the taxi driver will be cited in the accident >>> funeral plans are pending for a 19-year-old alyssa byrne. the petaluma girl whose body was found on a snowbank in tahoe after disappearing on new year's eve. this weekend several sonoma county restaurants are holding benefits in her honor. a photo of alyssa is greeting customers at the beyond the glory sports bar and also hanging photos of her that were taken when she played little league baseball. >> she was a ball of energy, a ball of life, and you know, she will be missed by us. every day. >> alyssa dreamt of becoming a firefighter paramedic, and members of cal fire presented her family a fire fighting patch to welcome her to the cal fire family. proceeds from the fund-raisers will go to
is referring to lee university singers who hail from the eu -- lee university in tennessee. next is a call from john. john is a naperville, illinois. an independent there. caller: i really enjoyed the inaugural program. in particular, president obama saying we need not choose between those who brought us where we are today and those who stand for where we will be in the future. then i have a question. what is the history behind the flags displayed in front of the white house? host: the white house or the capital? caller: the capital. host: there is information about the flags, which i can get for you, but not immediately. let's listen to a call from iran in georgia. you are on. republican. welcome. caller: i watched the first inauguration and thought it was wonderful. host: today the ceremonies? 2008? caller: the first inauguration he had. my main comments i wanted to make is being a republican, i am almost ashamed to say that. i did vote democratic, and i voted for president obama. the reason i did vote for him is because we need change and things to go on and start getting these people togeth
about it. the laws differ in europe and in the u.s. the european process is a finding sort of at the eu level, and we've been under investigation for almost two years by the commissioner they are and his staff. and during this period, they get comments from everybody and we give them literally millions of documents. we have not come and we're busy negotiating with them. we don't think we violated any european laws, but we're happy to have a conversation and we're sort of now waiting on what they decide to do. we have been negotiating back and forth, and they announced that publicly. in the united states, the law is similar but different in the way it is applied to in our case the government decided to have the federal trade commission look at this and similar investigations are underway. there's a similar hearing. i testified at the hearings but again, i don't see the consumer arm under section two, and we've asked the government to come back and give us examples of things which are violation of law. we haven't seen that yet. we are also in negotiations with them. so i'll would say we t
sessions already with our eu partners on doing exactly that. one interesting aspect you raised is those have not necessarily included the private sector or the critical infrastructure sectors. expanding the aperture to do that would make sense. >> in our last few minutes, thank you offer very important questions. secretary naplitano, as the content your future -- as you think about your future and some of the unfinished business, what is your highest priority? >> i think when i look at where i will be spending my time, aside from the management integration type issues, i think the coming immigration debate is something that we will be deeply involved in. we have deep and wide experience in those issues. cyber, we have already mentioned. then the constantly evolving types of terrorists threats and hamdi can better educate ourselves -- and how we can better educate ourselves, trained law enforcement, ascertain from history and otherwise what are better ways to identify behavior's indicate -- in take up potential violence, those are the things that concern me -- ways to identify and behavi
. -- that our current immigration system is not working effectively, indeed is 235eu8ing 0en 00 -- indeed is failing ton a daily basis cannot be denied. it needs to be fixed. it is a challenge for us to do so and will not be easy. i would, however, warn my colleagues that a framework is not a bill. and in 2006 and 2007 with the full support of the republican president of the united states, a bipartisan committee announced with great confidence that they had a plan that was going to fix our immigration system and we were all just going to line upped and vote for it much the masters of the universe had decided -- they'd meat in secret, they had all the special interest groups gather and they had worked out a plan that was going to change our immigration system for the better and we should all be most grateful. it came up with 2006, it did not pass. it came back again in 2007 with even more emphasis, and it failed coul loss -- and it failed colossally. it did not do it what they said it would do. it did not end the illegality. it did not set forth a proper principle of immigration for amer
Search Results 0 to 23 of about 24 (some duplicates have been removed)